A Sensor That Detects Spoiled Meat

This MIT device, based on modified carbon nanotubes, can detect amines produced by decaying meat. Image credit: Sophie Liu

This MIT device, based on modified carbon nanotubes, can detect amines produced by decaying meat. Image credit: Sophie Liu

MIT researchers are at it again – this time by inventing a sensor that detects spoiled meat.

The sensor, which was developed by a team of chemists, is portable and can detect gases emitted by rotting meat. This allows consumers to determine whether the meat in their refrigerator is safe to eat.

The researchers put their sensor to the test and found that various mets last over four days in the fridge but decay at different rates when left out. They recently published their findings in a scientific journal and have filed a patent for the technology, hoping to license it for commercial use.

The chemists foresee their sensor being used on “smart packaging” that displays more accurate safety information than an expiration date. They also hope it can cut down on food waste because people throw things out that aren’t bad, just based on the expiration date.

The sensor may also be incorporated into a wireless platform developed by the same lab that enables a smartphone to read the freshness of the meat, making it easy for consumers to tell whether or not to cook that piece of chicken.

This isn’t the first sensor that the lab has detected for freshness either. The lead researcher and others have also created one to detect the ripeness of the fruit.

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In 10 Years Your Kitchen May Not Have A Fridge Or Stove
Meld Makes Your Stove Smart

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